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  • br US Department of Health and Human Services

    2020-08-28

    
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    31. Reagan-Steiner S, Yankey D, Jeyarajah J, Elam-Evans LD, Curtis CR, MacNeil J, et al. National, regional, state, and selected local area vacci-nation coverage among adolescents aged 13-17 years—United States, 2015. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep 2016;65:850-8.
    33. Underwood NL, Weiss P, Gargano LM, Seib K, Rask KJ, Morfaw C, et al. Human papillomavirus vaccination among adolescents in Georgia. Hum Vaccin Immunother 2015;11:1703-8.
    34. McRee AL, Gilkey MB, Dempsey AF. HPV vaccine hesitancy: findings from a statewide survey of healthcare providers. J Pediatr Health Care 2014;28:541-9.
    35. Gilkey MB, Moss JL, McRee AL, Brewer NT. Do correlates of HPV vaccine initiation differ between adolescent boys and girls? Vaccine 2012;30:5928-34.
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    Cancer Prevention Education for Providers, Staff, Parents, and Teens Improves Adolescent 151 Human Papillomavirus Immunization Rates
    THE JOURNAL OF PEDIATRICS • www.jpeds.com Volume 205
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    152 Suryadevara et al
    ORIGINAL ARTICLES
    HPV vaccine is an important cancer
    prevention method for 530141-72-1 my adolescent
    patients
    HPV vaccine is effective in preventing
    cancer
    My adolescent patients are at risk for
    acquiring HPV infection and the subsequent
    Agree
    development of cancer
    HPV infection is associated with cancer
    Strongly agree
    Cancer prevention is within the scope of my
    practice
    Percentage of providers
    Figure 1. Pediatric provider attitudes toward HPV vaccine and cancer prevention practices.
    A
    Percentage of providers